Universal Copyright Convention, revised by the Paris convention on July 24, 1971

General Information

  1. Type: Convention
  2. Date of signature:
  3. Place of signature: Paris, France
  4. Depositary:
  5. Date of entry into force: 10/07/1974

Category

Intellectual property

Sub category

Copyright

Groups

UNESCO

What is it about?

The Universal Copyright Convention was proposed by the UNESCO to ensure the protection of copyrights on literary, scientific and cultural works. It provides similar provisions compared to the Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (Bern, 9 September 1886) concluded within the framework of WIPO. The provisions of the Universal Copyright Convention are, however, less stringent. The Convention requires that the minimum term of a copyright be the length of the life of the author plus 25 years. It also mandates that no nation may accord its own nationals stronger copyright protection than that given to nationals of other signatory parties, though a state may make exceptions under certain conditions. A formal copyright notice must appear in all copies of a work and consist of the symbol ©, the name of the copyright owner, and the year of first publication. A State Party, however, may require other formalities, provided domestic works are not favoured over foreign. The Convention was supplemented by two protocols adopted the same day. The first requires that stateless persons and refugees who have their habitual residence in a State party be assimilated to nationals of that State. The second extends the provisions of the Convention to works published by the UN, its specialized institutions and the Organization of American States.

Why is it relevant?

This instrument establishes the exclusive right of authors to use their literary, scientific and cultural works. By establishing norms slightly less severe than the provisions of the Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works (Bern, 9 September 1886), this instrument was signed by many American States and developing countries.

Additional Information

In the case of a conflict, the provisions of the 1886 Bern Convention prevail over the provisions of the present Convention if the conflicting States are State Parties to both Conventions.

Download

Restricted content, please sign in for view.

Restricted content, please sign in for view.

Restricted content, please sign in for view.